The History of Dialysis Clinic, Inc.

In the latter part of the 1960’s, an increasing pressure was being felt by all nephrologists to make available the techniques of hemodialysis to those patients dying of renal failure. In Nashville, this situation had reached crisis proportions with acute dialysis, home training, transplant back-up, and chronic dialysis all being managed in a three-bed, in-hospital dialysis facility. The hospital was unable to dedicate more space and resources to dialysis; therefore, another solution was needed. Although the concept of non-hospital based dialysis was still rather new at the time, it was well known that a freestanding dialysis facility in Seattle had worked quite well.

Because none of the other private Nashville hospitals provided chronic dialysis, the outpatient approach seemed not only a sensible solution, but the only solution to the Nashville dialysis dilemma. After many meetings with Chiefs of Services, Deans, and Chiefs of Hospital Staffs, approval of the medical center was obtained. A New York Foundation, The Life Extension Foundation, generously provided support for the undertaking, and on April 20, 1971, Dialysis Clinic, Inc. was formed as a non-profit corporation to provide care for dialysis patients in an outpatient dialysis facility in Nashville. The initial four-bed unit opened just one month later, on May 20, with borrowed and donated equipment and a group of very attentive nephrologists. Despite some concern, all went well through those most important early days, and despite the fact that federal aid for the dialysis patient was not to become a reality for over a year, the facility continued to be solvent.

As time went on, and as the Nashville facility grew and the operation seemed to be proceeding quite smoothly, it became apparent that many of the patients were traveling extraordinary distances to receive treatment. No facilities existed in Chattanooga, Knoxville, or Jackson, although each community served large medical populations. Therefore, with local medical support, DCI established facilities in these other communities so that patients could be dialyzed closer to home. By this time, the federal government, through Medicare, was funding dialysis, and more patients were being considered for treatment. These facilities were on hand to meet the needs of their communities.

The need for outpatient dialysis facilities was not unique to Tennessee. The pressure for patient care was being felt by other university and community nephrology programs. Through the years, some of those programs have invited DCI to participate with them in providing care for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). DCI has welcomed these associations and the sharing of expertise and ideas that they have made possible.

On July 18, 1977, Dialysis Clinic opened a facility in Cincinnati. It is a non-profit, non-hospital facility that provides dialysis and related services to patients with stabilized, chronic kidney failure. Approximately 150 hemodialysis patients receive three treatments a week at the Cincinnati Dialysis Clinic. In addition, the facility has a home training program for patients on peritoneal dialysis. About 40 patients are currently enrolled in it.

Since the first DCI facility in Cincinnati opened in 1977, Dialysis Clinic has opened four more clinics in the Cincinnati area: one in Western Hills, one in West Chester, another in Maysville, Kentucky, and its newest facility in Forest Park. All are affiliated with Dialysis Clinic, Inc. of Nashville, Tennessee, along with more than 200 other DCI facilities throughout the United States.

Just as DCI – Nashville was first formed as a non-profit corporation to provide services for patients in Nashville, the other DCI facilities, including the DCI facilities in the Cincinnati area, were opened in response to the needs of patients in their particular areas. The DCI facilities in Cincinnati opened in response to the request of the physicians at The University Hospital. They are open to all patients in the community who require chronic maintenance dialysis without regard to race, color, ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation, national origin, or culture.

Dialysis Clinic, Inc. is chartered as a tax-exempt (501.c.3) organization under the IRS rules and regulations. The Corporation has no members and is organized solely for the welfare of society and not individual profit. Consequently, there are no stockholders or owners. DCI is authorized to receive and maintain real and personal property, and to use and apply the whole or any part of the income there from and the principal thereof exclusively for charitable, scientific, and educational purpose. The Corporation has committed over $100,000,000 for local research, education, and non-profit activities.

Mission Statement

  • To provide ever improving quality care to our Patients through:
  • A patient centered team approach that addresses the patients’ holistic needs, including physical, mental, emotional, spiritual and social needs.
  • Comprehensive staff and patient education.
  • Research aimed at improving treatment methods.
  • Continuous evaluation of resources and methods used to provide services for improvement in effectiveness and efficiency.

Our Locations

Cincinnati:
499 E. McMillan St.
Cincinnati OH 45206
Ph. 513-281-0091
Western Hills:
6432 Glenway Ave.
Cincinnati OH 45211
Ph. 513-598-9050
Forest Park:
1075 Kemper Meadow Dr.
Cincinnati OH 45240
Ph. 513-522-6200
Maysville:
1210 Pope Dr.
Maysville KY 41056
Ph. 606-759-7689
West Chester:
7625 University Ct.
West Chester OH 45069
Ph. 513-777-0855
Drake Rehabilitaion Center:
151 W. Galbraith Rd.
Cincinnati OH 45215
Ph. 513-418-2475

In-Center Hemodialysis

In-Center Hemodialysis

In-Center Hemodialysis Bed Unit

In-Center Hemodialysis Bed Unit

Home Hemodialysis

Home Hemodialysis

Peritoneal Dialysis

Peritoneal Dialysis